Gut GI and Liver Hospital is

The Best Place

for patients

Our Specialities

  • Gastroenterology
  • Gastro-oncology
  • Surgical Gastroenterology - Minimal Access / laparoscopic Surgery/Open
  • Urology/Laparoscopic Uro-surgery
  • Laparoscopic Gynae surgery
  • Interventional Radiology/Radiology
  • Interventional Pain management
  • Pathology
  • Anesthesia
  • Critical Care & Intensive care
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  • Pulmonology
  • Physician
  • Physiotherapy
  • Visiting -
    • Cardiologist
    • Neuro-physician
    • Nepharologist
    • Endocrinologist
    • Psychiatrist
    • Dietician
  •  
  • Upper Endoscopy
  • Colonoscopy
  • Endoscopic Ultrasound
  • Therapeutic ERCP
  • Small Bowel Capsule Endoscopy
  • Flexible Sigmoidoscopy
  • Esophageal Dilation
  • Enteral Stenting
  • Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG)
  • Esophageal Manometry
  • Proctoscopy
  • Radiofrequency Ablation
  • pH Probe
  • Fibrotouch
  • Liver Transplant Consultation
  • Upper GI endoscopy is a procedure that uses a lighted, flexible endoscope to see inside the upper GI tract. The upper GI tract includes the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum—the first part of the small intestine. Upper GI endoscopy can detect ulcers, abnormal growths, precancerous conditions, inflammation, and hiatus hernia. It can be used to determine the cause of abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, swallowing difficulties, acid reflux, unexplained weight loss, anemia and bleeding in the upper GI tract. This diagnostic procedure helps in diagnosing and treating problems related to the upper gastrointestinal tract.

    Upper GI endoscopy can be used to remove stuck objects, including food, and to treat conditions such as bleeding ulcers. It can also be used to biopsy tissue in the upper GI tract. During a biopsy, a small piece of tissue is removed for later examination with a microscope.

    Colonoscopy is a procedure that uses a long, flexible, narrow tube with a light and tiny camera on one end, called a colonoscope, to look inside the rectum and entire colon. Colonoscopy can show irritated and swollen tissue, ulcers, and polyps (extra pieces of tissue that grow on the lining of the intestine). A colonoscopy is performed to help diagnose changes in bowel habits, abdominal pain, rectal bleeding, & weight loss. It is also used for colorectal cancer screening. If a polyp is seen, it is removed through the scope and sent to a pathologist to review under a microscope. If colonoscopy is being performed to identify sites of bleeding, the areas of bleeding may be controlled through the colonoscope by injecting certain medications or by coagulating the bleeding vessels.

    The colon must be completely clean for the procedure to be accurate and complete. Your physician will give you detailed instructions regarding it. In general, preparation consists of either consumption of a special cleansing solution, laxatives and enemas prior to the examination. Follow your doctor’s instructions carefully.

    Colonoscopy is usually well tolerated and rarely causes much pain. There is often a feeling of pressure, mild bloating, or cramping at times, during the procedure. This procedure is can performed with sedation also in sensitive patients. An Anesthesiologist will administer medication through a vein to help you relax and better tolerate any discomfort from the procedure. You will be lying on your side or on your back while the colonoscope is advanced slowly through the large intestine. As the colonoscope is slowly withdrawn, the lining is again carefully examined. The procedure usually takes 8 to 10 minutes. In some cases, passage of the colonoscope through the entire colon to its junction with the small intestine cannot be achieved.

    Sigmoidoscopy is the procedure indicated to view the sigmoid colon. This allows the doctor to examine up to sigmoid colon using a flexible tube with a light on it. It helps in detecting the presence of ulcers, polyps, abnormal cells, and cancer cells. Sometimes, your doctor may remove a piece of sigmoid colon tissue to examine under the microscope.

    During the procedure, the doctor inserts the sigmoidoscope (a flexible tube with a light and camera at the tip) into the anus. The colon is inflated to obtain a clear vision. The procedure may take about 10 to 20 minutes.

    Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) combines endoscopy and ultrasound in order to obtain images and information about the digestive tract and the surrounding tissue and organs. In EUS, a small ultrasound transducer is installed on the tip of the endoscope. By inserting the endoscope into the upper or the lower digestive tract, one can obtain high quality ultrasound images of the organs inside the body.

    Due to the proximity of the EUS transducer to the organ(s) of interest, the images obtained are frequently more accurate and more detailed than the ones obtained by traditional ultrasound. EUS is performed to evaluate abdominal pain, pancreatic masses/cysts, chronic pancreatitis, bile duct abnormalities, submucosal lesions, & staging of cancers of the digestive tract. EUS also can obtain information about the layers of the intestinal wall as well as adjacent areas such as lymph nodes and the blood vessels.

    Other uses of EUS include studying the flow of blood inside blood vessels using Doppler ultrasound, and to obtain tissue samples by passing a special needle, under ultrasound guidance, into enlarged lymph nodes or suspicious tumors. The tissue or cells obtained by the needle can be examined by a pathologist under a microscope. The process of obtaining tissue with a thin needle is called fine needle aspiration (FNA).

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, or ERCP, is a study of the ducts that drain the liver and pancreas. ERCP is used primarily to diagnose and treat conditions of the bile ducts, including gallstones, inflammatory strictures (scars), leaks (from trauma and surgery), and cancer.

    ERCP combines the use of x rays and an endoscope, which is a long, flexible, lighted tube. Through the endoscope, the physician can see the inside of the stomach and duodenum, and inject dyes into the ducts in the biliary tree and pancreas so they can be seen on x rays. If the exam shows a gallstone or narrowing of the ducts, the physician can insert instruments such as stents through the scope to remove or relieve the obstruction. Also, tissue samples (biopsy) can be taken for further testing.

    ERCP- ERCP refers to Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography. This diagnostic procedure helps in diagnosing and treating problems related to the liver, gall bladder, pancreas and bile duct.

    Capsule Endoscopy lets your doctor examine the lining of the middle part of your gastrointestinal tract, which includes the three portions of the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, ileum). Your doctor will use a pill sized video capsule , which has its own lens and light source and will view the images on a video monitor. You might hear your doctor or other medical staff refer to capsule endoscopy as small bowel endoscopy, capsule endoscopy, or wireless endoscopy.

    Capsule Endoscopy helps your doctor evaluate the small intestine. This part of the bowel cannot be reached by traditional upper endoscopy or by colonoscopy. The most common reason for doing capsule endoscopy is to search for a cause of bleeding from the small intestine. It may also be useful for detecting polyps, inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s disease), ulcers, and tumors of the small intestine.

    PEG stands for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, a procedure through which a flexible feeding tube is placed through the abdominal wall and into the stomach. It allows nutrition, fluids and/or medications to be put directly into the stomach, bypassing the mouth and esophagus. The doctor will use a lighted flexible tube called an endoscope to guide the creation of a small opening through the skin of the abdomen and directly into the stomach. This procedure allows the doctor to place and secure a feeding tube into the stomach.

    Patients generally receive a mild sedative and local anesthesia, and an antibiotic is given by vein prior to the procedure. Patients can usually go home the day of the procedure or the next day.

    PEG is the procedure that allows feeding directly to the stomach when the feeding through oral route is difficult. This procedure allows nutrition, fluids, and medications to be put into the stomach directly, bypassing the mouth and esophagus. Prior to the procedure, the patient receives a sedative or local anesthesia, and an antibiotic. During the procedure, the endoscopist places a light and flexible tube into the stomach through a small incision in the abdominal wall.

    A controlled stretching of narrowed areas of the esophagus, such as strictures, rings and webs, using Maloney, Savary or balloon dilators.

    Stents are devices used to maintain or restore the lumen of hollow organs, vessels, and ducts. Using the endoscope, they are inserted into the alimentary tract to relieve esophageal, gastroduodenal, biliary, and colonic malignant obstruction.

    This test measures the pressures and the pattern of muscle contractions in your esophagus. Abnormalities in the contractions and strength of the muscle or in the sphincter at the lower end of the esophagus can result in pain, heartburn, and/or difficulty swallowing. Esophageal manometry is used to diagnose the conditions that can cause these symptoms.

    An examination of the anus performed with an instrument only several inches in length, primarily to evaluate for hemorrhoids and fissures.

    Advance Machine To Evaluate Liver And Current Status Or Damage Of Hepatocytes, Mostly In Hbv, Hcv, Fatty Liver To Diagnose Fibrosis Or Cirrhosis.

    Liver transplantation or hepatic transplantation is an operation where a diseased liver is replaced with a whole or part of someone else's normal and healthy liver.

  • Acid reflux
  • Achalasia
  • Barrett's esophagus
  • candida esophagitis
  • cancer of the esophagus
  • diffuse esophageal spasm
  • eosinophiic esophagitis
  • gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
  • heart burn
  • hiatal hernia
  • scleroderma and c.r.e.s.t. syndrome effects on esophagus
  • strictures of the esophagus
  • ulcers of esophagus
  • varices
  • viral esophagitis
  • G.I.Bleed
  • Oesophagitis
  • Dysphagia
  • nutcracker esophagus
  • Schatzki's ring
  • adenocarcinoma of the stomach
  • arteriovenous malformations of stomach
  • bezoars
  • carcinoid of stomach
  • gastroparesis
  • Indigestion
  • helicobacter pylori infection
  • leiomyoma of stomach
  • lymphoma of stomach
  • polyps of stomach
  • nsaid-induced gastropathy
  • Gastric ulcers
  • G.I.Bleed
  • Gastrinoma
  • Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs)
  • Gastrostomy Tube Replacement
  • scleroderma and c.r.e.s.t. syndrome effects on esophagus
  • Watermelon stomach
  • Abdominal Compartment Syndrome
  • Abdominal Pain in Elderly Persons
  • Achlorhydria
  • Acute Gastritis
  • Atrophic Gastritis
  • Benign Gastric Tumors
  • CBRNE - Vomiting Agents - Dm, Da, Dc
  • Chronic Gastritis
  • Dumping Syndrome
  • Gastric Banding for GAVE
  • Gastric Cancer
  • Gastric Outlet Obstruction
  • Gastric Volvulus
  • Arteriovenous malformations
  • Bacterial overgrowth of small bowel
  • Crohn's disease
  • Duodenal ulcers
  • Idiopathic jejeunitis
  • Lymphoma of small intestine
  • Malabsorption syndromes
  • Parasitic and bacterial infections of small intestine
  • G.I.Bleed
  • Gastroenteritis
  • Afferent Loop Syndrome
  • Ascariasis
  • Balantidiasis
  • Benign Neoplasm of the Small Intestine
  • scleroderma and c.r.e.s.t. syndrome effects on esophagus
  • Cyclospora Infection (Cyclosporiasis)
  • Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis
  • Gastrointestinal Foreign Bodies
  • Giardiasis
  • Intestinal Carcinoid Tumor
  • Intestinal Fistula
  • Intestinal Flukes
  • Intestinal Leiomyosarcoma
  • Intestinal Lymphangiectasia
  • Intestinal Motility Disorders
  • Intestinal Polypoid Adenomas
  • Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction
  • Celiac Disease (Sprue)
  • Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia
  • Anal fissure
  • Carcinoid of colon
  • Infective Colitis
  • Colo rectal cancer
  • Crohn's colitis
  • Diarrhea
  • Diverticulosis
  • fecal incontinence
  • Indeterminate colitis
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Ischemic colitis
  • Lymphocytic colitis
  • Hemorrhoids
  • G.I.Bleed
  • Fecal Incontinence
  • Acute Megacolon
  • Amebiasis
  • Angiodysplasia of the Colon
  • Bacterial Gastroenteritis
  • Chronic Megacolon
  • Clostridium Difficile Colitis
  • scleroderma and c.r.e.s.t. syndrome effects on esophagus
  • Complications of Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • Constipation
  • Cytomegalovirus Colitis
  • Diverticulitis
  • Fistula-in-Ano
  • Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer
  • Hirschsprung Disease
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • Neutropenic Enterocolitis
  • Pilonidal Disease
  • Pseudomembranous Colitis Surgery
  • Radiation Enteritis and Proctitis
  • Shigellosis
  • Toxic Megacolon
  • Ulcerative Colitis
  • Villous Adenoma
  • Collagenous and Lymphocytic Colitis
  • Colon Cancer
  • Colonic Polyps
  • Biliary dyskinesia
  • Choledochocele
  • Choledochilithiasis
  • Polyps of gallbladder
  • Acalculous Cholecystitis
  • Acalculous Cholecystopathy
  • Ampullary Carcinoma
  • Bile Duct Strictures
  • Bile Duct Tumors
  • Biliary Disease
  • Biliary Obstruction
  • Biliary Trauma
  • Carcinoma of the Ampulla of Vater
  • Cholangiocarcinoma
  • Cholangitis
  • Cholecystitis
  • Scleroderma and c.r.e.s.t. syndrome effects on esophagus
  • Cholecystitis Empiric Therapy
  • Cholecystitis Organism-Specific Therapy
  • Cholecystocutaneous Fistula
  • Choledochal Cysts
  • Emphysematous Cholecystitis
  • Gallbladder Cancer
  • Gallbladder Empyema
  • Gallbladder Mucocele
  • Gallbladder Tumors
  • Gallbladder Volvulus
  • Gallstones (Cholelithiasis)
  • Pericholangitis
  • Postcholecystectomy Syndrome
  • Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis
  • Recurrent Pyogenic Cholangitis
  • Auto-immune pancreatitis
  • pancreatic cholera
  • pancreatic insufficiency
  • Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (gastrinoma)
  • Acute Pancreatitis
  • Chronic Pancreatitis
  • Hyperamylasemia
  • Pancreatic Cancer
  • Pancreatic Divisum
  • Pancreatic Necrosis and Pancreatic Abscess
  • Pancreatic Pseudoaneurysm
  • Pancreatic Pseudocysts
  • Pancreatic Trauma
  • Papillary Tumors
  • Acute Liver Failure
  • Alcoholic Hepatitis
  • Amebic Liver/Hepatic Abscesses
  • Autoimmune Hepatitis
  • Budd-Chiari Syndrome
  • Cardiac Cirrhosis and Congestive Hepatopathy
  • Chyle Fistula
  • Chylous Ascites
  • Cirrhosis
  • Conjugated Hyperbilirubinemia
  • Dubin-Johnson Syndrome
  • Fatty Liver
  • Fibrolamellar Carcinoma
  • Hepatic Cystadenomas
  • Hepatic Cysts
  • Hepatic Encephalopathy
  • Portosystemic Encephalopathy
  • Primary Biliary Cholangitis (Primary Biliary Cirrhosis)
  • Pyogenic Hepatic Abscesses
  • Transjugular Liver Biopsy
  • Viral Hepatitis
  • Yellow Fever
  • adenomas of liver
  • alcoholic liver disease
  • alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C
  • Hepatitis C Organism-Specific Therapy
  • Hepatitis E
  • Hepatocellular Adenoma
  • Hepatorenal Syndrome
  • Hydatid Cysts
  • Isoniazid Toxicity
  • Liver Abscess
  • Liver Disease and Pregnancy
  • Liver Transplantation
  • Percutaneous Liver Biopsy
  • Portal Hypertension
  • Portal Vein Obstruction
  • Hepatic Hemangiomas
  • cysts of liver
  • focal nodular hyperplasia
  • hemachromatoisis
  • non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
  • non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)
  • toxic hepatitis
  • Wilson's disease
  • Enlarged spleen
  • Chylothorax
  • Enteropathic Arthropathies
  • Familial Adenomatous Polyposis
  • Food Poisoning
  • Gastrointestinal Disease and Pregnancy
  • Hemochromatosis
  • Malignant Atrophic Papulosis
  • UGI endoscopy
  • Colonoscopy
  • Endoscopic ultrasound
  • ERCP
  • Enteroscopy
  • Argon plasma coagulation
  • Capsule endoscopy (small bowel endoscopy)
  • Oesophageal dilation
  • Enteral stenting
  • Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (peg)
  • Esophageal manometry
  • Proctoscopy
  • Rut (rapid urease test)
  • Biopsies for HPE & MTB-PCR
  • All diagnostics endoscopies
  • All therapeutic endoscopies
    • Cardiologist
    • Ercp
    • Peg tube placement
    • Laparoscopic assisted enteroscopy
  • Dilatation
    • Oesophageal dilatation
    • Pyloric channel dilatation
    • Pneumatic dilatation
    • Cre balloon dilatation
    • Savary gillard dilatation
  • Gi bleed management
    • Banding- oeophageal varices
    • Haemoclips
    • Gold probe coagulation
    • Adrenaline injection - ulcer bleed
    • Haemostatic powder
    • Glue injection- fundic varix
  • Foreign body extraction
    • Coin
    • Nail
    • Caps
    • All foreign body
  • SILS is used for a wide range of procedure & significantly reduces scarring in addition to quicker recovery times.

    Bariatric Surgery-Bariatric Procedures like Sleeve Gastrectomy and gastric bypass. With the surgery being performed through the navel, it does not leave any visible scars compared to a traditional multi port laparoscopic approach.(Coming soon)

    Stapled haemorrhoidectomy-This is a surgical procedure used to treat hemorrhoids. In this surgical procedure the unusually enlarged hemorrhoidal tissue is removed, after which the remaining hemorrhoidal tissue is brought back to its normal position.

    Lap Hernia Repair-It refers to the treatment of the Hiatial Hernia using a laparoscope. Hiatial hernia is the protrusion of an organ through its surface or cavity. There are multiple approaches to this procedure including Nissen fundoplication and general laparoscopic hernia repair.

    The department of Surgical Gastroenterology provides a full range of General and Gastro Intestinal surgeries and features some of the leading doctors in the field of General and Minimal Access Surgeries. Surgeries using minimal access techniques are practiced facilitating faster recovery, avoid complications and ensure easier post-surgical follow-ups.

  • LESS TRAUMA FOR BODY
  • LESSER WOUND INFECTION
  • MINIMAL BLOOD LOSS
  • LESSER PAIN
  • FAST RECOVERY AND DISCHARGE
  • SUPERIOR COSMETIC OUTCOME
  • Laparascopic surgeries
    • Lap.Appendectomy
    • Lap.Chole
  • Surgeries
    • Colo-Rectal and Anal Tumors
    • Tuberculosis of Digestive Tract
    • Piles
    • Fissure
    • Fistula
    • Hydrocele